The hoax of the Nazi table produced by Ikea

The table photograph Hadolf shaped swastika appeared on social networks and was shared thousands of times, forcing the Swedish furniture giant to deny the news

A table in the form of a swastika, on display on the Ikea catalog. In Germany it took was a modified photograph with some simple touch of Photoshop to unleash a veritable media storm on the famous Swedish company of home products. The picture, obviously false, represented the elusive Hadolf table, square with ad hoc slots designed to transform it in the fatal symbol of the Nazi Party. All this at a price of 88 euro for nothing random, with that double-8 often used as an abbreviation for Heil Hitler salute.

A hoax full-blown, in short, and even rather obvious. But so they have not thought about thousands and thousands of people – as unfortunately happens often – have begun to share the image on their social network without verifying its truthfulness, blaming Ikea for the crazy idea of ​​putting a similar product in the catalog. Moral: the Swedish company had to intervene with an official statement of its spokesman categorically deny that he had ever made or even thought of producing a table dedicated to Hitler.

And now he would be willing to identify the author of the photograph to be claim compensation for the loss of image.